Phillies Player Tested Positive

By / January 5, 2009 / Uncategorized

UPDATE 2:41PM – January 6

J.C. Romero will be allowed to participate in Spring Training. The Phillies will also be using him during the exhibition games. When the season starts, he will remain in an extended Spring Training. He will pitch in 16 minor league games in May.

The issue of him pitching in the World Baseball Classic has not been resolved. He was to pitch for Puerto Rico.

The full report can be read on ESPN.com.

Philadelphia Phillies pitcher, J.C. Romero has been suspended for testing positive for performance-enhancing drugs. He has received the 50 games suspension which will be served the first 50 games of the 2009 season and is fined $1.25 million.

According to ESPN.com, he tested positive after the Mets and Phillies game in August, but was allowed to continue to pitch because he was cleared to take the supplement by the Phillies trainers.

Later in November, he received a letter from the Players Association saying the following,

“We have previously told you there is no reason to believe a supplement bought at a U.S. based retail store could cause you to test positive under our Drug Program. That is no longer true. We have recently learned of three substances which can be bought over the counter at stores in the United States that will cause you to test positive. These three supplements were purchased at a GNC and Vitamin Shoppe in the U.S.”

I have to say I do feel sorry for him. He did get it cleared by his nutritionist and by the Phillies trainers. He should not be held accountable for what happened.

If the PA recently learned of three new substances after the fact, he cannot be held responsible. The PA should have informed all players. Romero in no way should be considered a cheater if he indeed did his research before using the supplement.

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Tanya

2 Comments

Ed Leyro

My first reaction as a Mets fan would be to be happy that a Philthie pitcher was suspended since this might be beneficial to the Mets. However, upon reading the article, you are correct in that it is not Romero’s fault. Unfortunately, when a player is suspended today, it becomes attached to that player and overshadows his accomplishments on the field, even if it is not the player’s fault as in Romero’s case. Romero is already an excellent lefty specialist, but now no matter what he does for the rest of his career, failing a drug test will be one of the first things mentioned. Let’s see what the PA can do to rectify this.

Reply
Ed Leyro

My first reaction as a Mets fan would be to be happy that a Philthie pitcher was suspended since this might be beneficial to the Mets. However, upon reading the article, you are correct in that it is not Romero’s fault. Unfortunately, when a player is suspended today, it becomes attached to that player and overshadows his accomplishments on the field, even if it is not the player’s fault as in Romero’s case. Romero is already an excellent lefty specialist, but now no matter what he does for the rest of his career, failing a drug test will be one of the first things mentioned. Let’s see what the PA can do to rectify this.

Reply

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