A Greedy Brother

By / January 21, 2009 / Offseason

Philadelphia Phillies first baseman, Ryan Howard, is seeking another record  breaking contract through arbitration. He wants $18 million. The Phillies feel he is only worth $14 million.

Either way, it is a significant increase from the $10 million he won last year through the arbitration hearings.

Maybe Howie has not heard about the economic crisis that is worldwide. He is crazy.

Now, I’m not saying he does not deserve to be paid. Numbers do not lie, my friends. He smacked 48 home runs and 146 RBI’s in during the 2008 season. Yet, to me $18 million is still too steep.

He should quit being greedy and sign the $14 million deal.

After all, Phillies ace Cole Hamels signed a three-year deal worth $20.5 million. As I stated in my previous post, he deserves  more than that. He was their World Series MVP.

Suck it up, Howie. Hamels is more crucial than you. After all, great pitching stops great hitting.

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Tanya

4 Comments

Ed Leyro

Here’s a telling stat about Howard. Despite the fact that he is a feared slugger, he walked 26 fewer times this past season than in 2007 despite the fact that he played 18 more games. That means he is becoming less selective at the plate and becoming more of a free swinger. It also means pitchers aren’t so afraid to pitch to him the way they were afraid to pitch to Barry Bonds. For all the power he supplies, he may continue to be a .250 hitter if he doesn’t take a few more pitches. No .250 hitter deserves $18 million. If he ends up getting that amount, what’s he going to look for when he becomes a free agent, $25-$30 million annually?

Reply
Ed Leyro

Here’s a telling stat about Howard. Despite the fact that he is a feared slugger, he walked 26 fewer times this past season than in 2007 despite the fact that he played 18 more games. That means he is becoming less selective at the plate and becoming more of a free swinger. It also means pitchers aren’t so afraid to pitch to him the way they were afraid to pitch to Barry Bonds. For all the power he supplies, he may continue to be a .250 hitter if he doesn’t take a few more pitches. No .250 hitter deserves $18 million. If he ends up getting that amount, what’s he going to look for when he becomes a free agent, $25-$30 million annually?

Reply

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