Are The Mets Mentally or Physically Fragile?

By / March 17, 2011 / 2011 Season, Injuries, Spring Training

There is always something that can be said about the New York Mets over the past several years. Numerous injuries have plagued them. Some of the players have even shown mental wear and tear. Remember when Mike Pelfrey needed to see a psychiatrist to help him? Mets fans have most certainly shown signs of mental fragility. So much so that some cannot even bring themselves to watch a game until there is reason to.

The Mets continue to struggle through injuries, even before the regular season has started. They lose Johan Santana until around June or July. Then Carlos Beltran goes out with soreness in his knees. Mets fans would be grateful if some type of season ending injury would find its way to Oliver Perez which would force management to make a decision concerning the inept “pitcher”.

There is at least one member of the 2011 New York Mets who is showing extreme signs of mental strain, Luis Castillo. It has been reported the second baseman told Mets manager, Terry Collins, that if he is not the starting second baseman, he would like a trade. He feels he can still play every day, this despite his lack of range defensively. It has also been noted that Collins has grown weary of Castillo’s defeated attitude in the clubhouse because he has to compete for his job.

Having to compete for a job is a part of the game in baseball. Nobody is guaranteed a position unless they can prove they deserve it. Even at the point, you can be pulled at any moment in the event you mess up. It is the nature of the beast. Castillo should understand that. If he cannot, then give him his walking papers.

Over the years, since 2008, the players on the New York Mets start to show mental strain a little after the All-Star break. They stop playing hard. You can see it in their batting stances, in the dugout and in their defense. Every time they begin to slip in the standings, their attitudes follow suit.

Well welcome to game of baseball, kiddies. You have to be mentally strong to handle this stage. You cannot have a defeated attitude here no matter how dismal things get. If you slip in the standings, you fight that much harder to get back up. Even if you are out of the playoff race, if you go down, you had better take everyone with you. Hell, that is my attitude in life: If I go down, I’m taking everyone with me.

That is the same attitude these Mets need to have.  They have their season cut out for them with Philadelphia Phillies and Atlanta Braves.  The Florida Marlins are just pests who are not going to go anywhere, but will take the Mets down if allowed because it seems since 2007 they are the ones who kill the Mets.

This is a long season. It takes all 162 games to determine who the winner of the NL East is. The Mets have to be able to battle in every single game they play. There is no room for error. There is no room for weariness. There is no room for selfishness. You do what is best for the team, even if that means your butt sits on the bench. In the end, when all is said and done, everyone contributes and every one wins. You win as a team and you lose as a team.

Almost every member of the 2011 Mets has an attitude to fight. They are on the fields in Port St. Lucie fighting every day to master the fundamentals they have been lacking, to hit better, to hit better and to learn how to fight. This is the team the fans want and need. Management needs to cut anybody and everybody who does not have this attitude. They need to get rid of those who have a defeated attitude or have their own best interest at heart. If not, yes, this team will not go anywhere.

I suggest this team put on their baseball fatigues and get ready for the battle of the fittest, both physically and mentally. Remember, it is the strong that survive.

About Author

Tanya

1 Comment

dyhrdmet

I think the Mets are BOTH physically and mentally fragile. At least those Mets that were with the club in October of 2006 through 2010. I think the old regime pushed some players beyond their physical limits and all of the collapse stuff has to wear on them mentally. Maybe with the new regime in Flushing/Port St. Lucie, some of that will be cleared up.

Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to Top